About Blind Cricket

About Blind Cricket

Blind cricket  was first documented in Australia in the early 1920's. The game picked up momentum in the early 1990s in India, with George Abraham being the driving force behind the blind cricket movement.

In Nepal it started on 14th August 2006 with the help of PBCC’s chairman Aga Souquat Ali.

The game

All the rules and techniques of Blind Cricket are familiar to cricket players everywhere. However, the subtle differences are highlighted below.

The game is played with a ball made of hard plastic and filled with tiny ball bearings. Bowling is underarm and the ball has to pitch once before the mid pitch. This limits the height at which the ball will reach the batsman. The bowler gives an audible signal before bowling and the batsmen gives an audible signal when he is ready.

The wickets are screwed together to ensure they are aligned. The boundaries are 45 yards from the pitch (and can be shorter for women).

A match is played between two teams of 11 players comprising a minimum of 4 totally blind players (B1’s), 3 partially blind players (B2’s) and a maximum of 4 partially sighted players (B3’s). The visual impairment of each groups is as follows.

B1: No light perception in either eye up to light perception, but inability to recognise shape of a hand at any distance or in any direction.

B2: From ability to recognise the shape of the hand up to a visual acuity of 2/60 or visual field of less than five degrees in the better eye after correction.

B3: From visual acuity above 2/60 up to visual acuity of 6/60 or a visual field of less than 20 degrees in the better eye after correction.

The B1 players will be distinguished on the field by a Blue Wrist Band to be worn on the right.

The B2 players will be distinguished on the field by a Red Arm Band to be worn on the left arm. One or Two stripes on the upper arm may also be used.

The B3 players will be distinguished on the field by an Orange Arm Band to be worn on the left arm. Three stripes on the upper arm may also be used.

The composition of the team throughout the match will be as per the ratio of the three categories mentioned above. While nominating the team of 11 players before the toss, a 12th man in each of the three categories is also to be announced.

A new batsmen must come from a new group (B1, B2, B3), in sequence.

A B1 batsman shall have a runner and a B2 batsman has the option of a runner. However, a batsman who has opted for a runner cannot act as runner for another batsman.

A runner is allowed to be changed only if all the other players are out. All other rules pertaining to the runner as spelt out in the MCC rules of cricket would be applicable. When a Batsman is at the Striker’s end his Runner must not stand closer than ten feet to the batting crease. The fielding Captain may ask the Runner to stand on the other side of the pitch if necessary.

If a B1 fielder goes off the field, he can be substituted only by a B1 fielder. A B2 fielder can be substituted by a B2 or a B1 fielder. A B3 fielder can be substituted by a B1/B2 or a B3 fielder.

A fielder who goes off the field, on his return can bowl only after he has been on the field for the number of overs, he had been off the field.

The bat

A regular cricket bat can be used.

The pitch

The middle of the pitch has to be clearly marked with a line across.

Lines shall be drawn to make an area, which measures ten feet from the middle stump at each end. The line will be drawn at each batting end on leg side and off side. This line is so marked to indicate where the Runner shall stand.

The pitch is 22 yards long and 3 yards wide. Wide ball markings are made at both ends of the pitch on either side of the wickets at a distance of 2 feet from the outside of the leg and off stumps.

The wickets

Each wicket shall consist of three tubular stumps (either metal, plastic, or wood). The colour of the wickets shall be fluorescent orange or yellow.

Scoring

All runs scored off the bat by a B1 batsman shall be doubled and will be credited to the batsman.

Caught

A "one bounce" catch by a B1 player will result in the batsman being given out.

The fieldsman

No fielder shall dive, or lie down until the batsman has played a stroke or the ball has passed the batsman.

A B1 player may also wear gloves and helmet while fielding.

Dismissals

A batsman can be out in all the ways as laid down in the MCC rules of cricket. The batsman can be given out if he is bowled, caught, lbw, stumped, run out, hit wicket, handling the ball, double hitting, obstructing the field, timed out.

For a link to the World Blind Cricket Council rule book click here.

The game

 

All the rules and techniques of Blind Cricket are familiar to cricket players everywhere. However, the subtle differences are highlighted below.

 

The game is played with a ball made of hard plastic and filled with tiny ball bearings. Bowling is underarm and the ball has to pitch once before the mid pitch. This limits the height at which the ball will reach the batsman. The bowler gives an audible signal before bowling and the batsmen gives an audible signal when he is ready.

 

The wickets are screwed together to ensure they are aligned. The boundaries are 45 yards from the pitch (and can be shorter for women).

 

A match is played between two teams of 11 players comprising a minimum of 4 totally blind players (B1’s), 3 partially blind players (B2’s) and a maximum of 4 partially sighted players (B3’s). The visual impairment of each groups is as follows.

 

B1: No light perception in either eye up to light perception, but inability to recognise shape of a hand at any distance or in any direction.

 

B2: From ability to recognise the shape of the hand up to a visual acuity of 2/60 or visual field of less than five degrees in the better eye after correction.

 

B3: From visual acuity above 2/60 up to visual acuity of 6/60 or a visual field of less than 20 degrees in the better eye after correction.

 

The B1 players will be distinguished on the field by a Blue Wrist Band to be worn on the right.

 

The B2 players will be distinguished on the field by a Red Arm Band to be worn on the left arm. One or Two stripes on the upper arm may also be used.

 

The B3 players will be distinguished on the field by an Orange Arm Band to be worn on the left arm. Three stripes on the upper arm may also be used.

 

The composition of the team throughout the match will be as per the ratio of the three categories mentioned above. While nominating the team of 11 players before the toss, a 12th man in each of the three categories is also to be announced.

 

A new batsmen must come from a new group (B1, B2, B3), in sequence.

 

A B1 batsman shall have a runner and a B2 batsman has the option of a runner. However, a batsman who has opted for a runner cannot act as runner for another batsman.

 

A runner is allowed to be changed only if all the other players are out. All other rules pertaining to the runner as spelt out in the MCC rules of cricket would be applicable. When a Batsman is at the Striker’s end his Runner must not stand closer than ten feet to the batting crease. The fielding Captain may ask the Runner to stand on the other side of the pitch if necessary.

 

If a B1 fielder goes off the field, he can be substituted only by a B1 fielder. A B2 fielder can be substituted by a B2 or a B1 fielder. A B3 fielder can be substituted by a B1/B2 or a B3 fielder.

 

A fielder who goes off the field, on his return can bowl only after he has been on the field for the number of overs, he had been off the field.

 

The bat

 

A regular cricket bat can be used.

 

The pitch

 

The middle of the pitch has to be clearly marked with a line across.

 

Lines shall be drawn to make an area, which measures ten feet from the middle stump at each end. The line will be drawn at each batting end on leg side and off side. This line is so marked to indicate where the Runner shall stand.

 

The pitch is 22 yards long and 3 yards wide. Wide ball markings are made at both ends of the pitch on either side of the wickets at a distance of 2 feet from the outside of the leg and off stumps.

 

The wickets

 

Each wicket shall consist of three tubular stumps (either metal, plastic, or wood). The colour of the wickets shall be fluorescent orange or yellow.

 

Scoring

 

All runs scored off the bat by a B1 batsman shall be doubled and will be credited to the batsman.

 

Caught

 

A "one bounce" catch by a B1 player will result in the batsman being given out.

 

The fieldsman

 

No fielder shall dive, or lie down until the batsman has played a stroke or the ball has passed the batsman.

 

A B1 player may also wear gloves and helmet while fielding.

 

Dismissals

 

A batsman can be out in all the ways as laid down in the MCC rules of cricket. The batsman can be given out if he is bowled, caught, lbw, stumped, run out, hit wicket, handling the ball, double hitting, obstructing the field, timed out.

 

For a link to the World Blind Cricket Council rule book click here.

 

http://blindcricketindia.org/thegame/WBCC%20International%20Playing%20Rules.pdf